Posts Tagged ‘performance’

Bring Out the Best of Your Talent

Monday, February 25th, 2019

In his book, Talent is Never Enough, author John Maxwell says, “Too many talented people who start with advantages over others lose that advantage because they rest on their talent instead of raising it. They assume that talent alone will keep them out front. They don’t realize the truth that if they merely wing it, others will fly past them. Talent is more common than they think. Mega-best-selling author Stephen King asserts that, ‘Talent is cheaper than table salt. What separates the talented individual from the successful one is a lot of hard work.’”

Without question, our business, like any other, abounds with talented people who never come close to reaching their potential. This is because while talent is a great head start, it is no guarantee of performance. One must make right choices consistently in order to get the most out of the gifts one has. You can use these points to develop your own talent, as well as to coach those on your team to make daily choices that bring out the best of their own talent.

1.    Belief lifts your talent.

The first and greatest obstacle to success for most people is their belief in themselves. Once people figure out where their “sweet spot” is (the area where they’re most gifted) what often hinders them isn’t a lack of talent, but a lack of trust in themselves that becomes a self-imposed ceiling. To lift your talent, you’ve got to stop seeing yourself only as you currently are and begin to see yourself as you potentially could be; then, do all you can daily to close that gap.

2.    Initiative activates your talent.

Talent-plus people don’t wait for everything to be perfect to move forward. They don’t wait for all the problems or obstacles to disappear, or for fear to subside. They take initiative, because initiative creates momentum. And momentum is a leader’s best friend. Increase your inclination to initiate by realizing that desire, good intentions, and talent aren’t enough. Success requires initiative, and the greatest time wasted is the time getting started.

3.    Focus directs your talent.

Focus does not come naturally to us, yet it is essential for anyone wanting to make the most of their talent. Having talent without focus is like being an octopus on roller skates. There’s plenty of movement, but you don’t know in what direction it will be. Increase your focus by giving up spending too much time with the things—and people—in your life that distract you and take your eyes off your dreams. If you know that you have talent, and you are energetic and active but still don’t see meaningful results, then lack of focus is likely your problem.

4.    Preparation positions your talent.

What happens when you don’t prepare? Things you hoped won’t happen do happen—and they occur with greater frequency than the things you hoped would happen. The reason is simple: being unprepared puts you out of position. Increase your preparation ethic by deciding to pay the price to prepare daily and accepting that preparation is not glamorous; and, that it’s often long and slow, but you cannot wait for the opportunity to appear before you start preparing. Prepare in anticipation of the opportunity, and when it comes you will be ready. You don’t get a second-chance to seize upon a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

5.    Perseverance sustains your talent.

While talent provides hope for accomplishment, perseverance helps ensure it. Playwright Noel Coward commented, “Thousands of people have talent. I might as well congratulate you for having eyes in your head. The one and only thing that counts is: Do you have staying power?” Improve perseverance by having a vision that inspires you to keep moving, and grasp that the number one characteristic of a leader is the ability to make positive things happen – and that takes perseverance. Without perseverance, a talented person is little more than a one hit wonder.

6.    Teachability expands your talent.

If you are a highly talented person, you may have a tough time with teachability because talented people often think they know it all – which makes it difficult for them to expand their talent. Improve your teachability by changing your attitude toward learning. Learning is energizing and gives you an edge. It changes your thoughts, which improves your actions, which edifies your results. When you see learning in this light, you won’t be able to get enough of it!

7.    Character protects your talent.

Many talented people make it to the limelight, but the ones who have neglected to develop strong character rarely stay there long. Absence of strong character eventually topples talent because people are often tempted to take shortcuts. Hone your character by accepting that while many of your circumstances are beyond your control, your character is not. Character is the sum total of your everyday choices. Thus, great character is built by making right choices, one choice at a time, and it is destroyed one poor choice at a time. Talented, but low-character people aren’t done in by outside forces, they self-destruct through bad decisions.

How to Lead from the Middle

Wednesday, September 26th, 2018

The challenges posed by leading from the middle were framed well by John Maxwell who wrote, “One of the toughest things about being a leader in the middle of an organization is that you can’t be sure of where you stand. As a leader, you have some power and authority. You can make some decisions. You have access to some resources. At the same time, you lack power in other areas and if you overstep your authority, you can get yourself into real trouble. Unless you are the owner or CEO, your power is on loan from someone with higher authority. And that person has the power to take that authority away from you by firing you, demoting you or moving you into another area of the business. If that doesn’t create tension, nothing will.”

When you learn to lead well from the middle you’re not as likely to stay in the middle; whereas leading poorly from a middle management position makes promotion less likely, and eventual obscurity more certain. Following are nine sample ways to lead from the middle of the pack in your organization: the sales manager serving his or her GSM well, and the GSM doing likewise to the GM, the GM to the dealer, and the like.
1.    If they have not already been established, ask your boss to clearly define performance expectations and parameters for making decisions. You’ve got to be on the same page as your boss concerning what’s most important, by when, and your permissible boundaries to make it happen. Don’t guess or wrongly assume. Without clarity you can’t aggressively execute what you’re responsible for getting done.

2.    Take initiative.  A key characteristic of effective leadership is a bias for action that translates to an ability to make things happen. Bring ideas to your boss, as well as solutions rather than just problems. If you see what needs to be done do it! It is better to be told to wait than to wait to be told. Once you understand what’s expected as outlined in the first point, take the initiative to figure out how it can be done; then execute.

3.    Execute your work with impeachable integrity. Don’t be another has-been in the business lore of high achievers who self-destructed because they got results the wrong way. The end doesn’t justify the means if you cut corners, violate values, or abuse others to get the job done. Effective leadership isn’t just about getting results but getting them the right way.

4.    Stop trying to fix your boss.  You can’t fix your boss any more than you can fix your spouse or any other human being. Besides, your job isn’t to fix your leader; it’s to add value to that leader. Supplement their weaknesses and adjust your attitude towards the leader in areas that cause friction for you.

5.    Develop a solid relationship with your leader.  You don’t have to be good friends, or even hang out, but there had better be some common ground of trust, respect, and mutual understanding within a relationship or you’ll be miserable most of the time— and eventually starting over again elsewhere.  The first reaction to working for an ineffective leader, or one with whom you don’t get along is often to withdraw from him or her and build relational barriers. You’ve got to work to counterintuitively fight that urge. If you make your leader your adversary, you will create a no-win situation. Instead, find common ground and do your part to go the second mile to build a solid professional relationship.

6.    Publicly support your boss.  Some managers foolishly do just the opposite: they publicly gossip and complain about, disrespect, or seek ways to undermine their boss. Discuss disagreements privately with your boss, and don’t talk to other people about your boss. He or she will find out, and you’ll also reveal character flaws to all listening to your rants that diminish you in their eyes. Others will also realize you may be doing the same to them or would someday if the opportunity arose. Andy Stanley said it well, “Loyalty publicly results in leverage privately.”

7.    Manage yourself.  You will not impress your leader for long with your ability to manage others if you cannot first manage yourself. This includes managing your attitude, emotions, time, daily routine, discipline, character choices and self-accountability.

8.    Accept responsibility for your results when they fall short.  Just own it—your results, attitude, decisions, all of it. In fact, if you want to earn even more respect and influence, take responsibility for more than your share. That sort of confidence and humility will draw others to you. When things go wrong, put away your black belt in blame and search for solutions not scapegoats. Be coachable, make adjustments, learn from shortfalls and mistakes, and grow both personally and professionally.

9.    Lighten your leader’s load.  Perhaps the best way to accomplish this is by doing your own work with such excellence and integrity that you’re the one your boss never has to worry about getting it done, or holding accountable, or micromanaging. Then go further by looking for tasks you can take off your leader; especially those areas where you’re strong but he or she isn’t. Be the “go-to” person every leader craves, values, and takes a special interest in.

Following these steps for leading from the middle creates a triple-win: you win because you’re more effective, fulfilled, and successful; your boss wins because with people like you around, he or she can grow to entirely new levels; and the organization wins as well, as both teammates and customers reap the rewards of effective leadership at the helm of any department. While no one in business should ever truly be considered as “indispensable,” you can come pretty darned close in your own boss’ eyes by living these nine mandates every single day.