Posts Tagged ‘learntolead.com’

Don’t Confuse the Scoreboard for the Game!

Monday, August 29th, 2011

Good leaders are students of the numbers. Great leaders are students of behaviors. This is because great leaders know that their own and their people’s behaviors will ultimately determine the numbers, and that by watching them, reinforcing them, and intervening when they’re off track, they can influence outcomes before they’re final. Because many managers spend more time managing “stuff” than leading people, they often confuse the scoreboard for the game. They ponder reports, crunch numbers and get dazed by data, never taking their eyes off the scoreboard as they anticipate what numbers the team is producing. On the other hand, the best and most astute leaders stay in the game. They invest more time in the trenches with their people than in their office with “administrivia,” positively impacting the numbers that show up on the scoreboard.

While spending adequate time with the numbers part of your job is important, you can’t afford to become a passive leader who awaits results versus doing all you can to personally impact them. Many managers who at one time led effectively now simply tweak, tinker, tamper, manage, massage, maintain, administer or preside. While these folks may still have a leadership title, they lead no one and impact nothing. They are ceremonial leaders at best, perfectly content to record history rather than to help make it.

If disappointing numbers catch a manager by surprise, it normally indicates they didn’t spend enough time evaluating, coaching, and redirecting the daily behaviors of their people that created those numbers. Because of their neglect, the ineffective seeds their team members sowed each day inevitably manifested in the form of a lean harvest. There’s no need to let this happen to you. By studying the daily behaviors of your people and acting upon them, you don’t need a crystal ball to predict where a particular department in your enterprise is headed. Just pay more attention to what’s happening today because it becomes the future. Following are two sample behavioral areas to manage daily.

 1. Are people doing enough of what matters? In other words, is activity translating into accomplishment? What’s more important than people staying busy each day is making sure they are busy doing what matters most. By meeting one-on-one with each team member and helping them to structure their day so that they are working within the discipline of priorities, you can ensure that their daily behaviors will stay on track and bear fruit come scoreboard time.

 2. What are people doing with their down time? When traffic and the activity it creates slows down, do your people convert their down time into prime time by practicing, prospecting, planning; and following up, or do they become passive and watch, wish and wait for something to happen? It’s the manager’s responsibility to create daily, structured activities that keep people in motion and engaged with productive tasks in-between customers.

 While the two aforementioned disciplines are basic, they are often overlooked, and require diligence to ensure day-in, day-out execution. If you owned a professional sports team, it would be hard to imagine that you would tolerate a well-paid coach who lounged in an office, paid scant attention to the game, and passively waited to see what numbers appeared on the scoreboard, as he held his breath, crossed his fingers and hoped for the best. No, if you were in the owner’s suite, you’d undoubtedly insist that your coach maintained a positive presence on the field, with the team, observing, analyzing, reinforcing, and redirecting as necessary in order to ensure there was a “W” on the scoreboard at the game’s conclusion. You’d make sure that your coach and team exercised the daily disciplines necessary to win the game. What have you done today to ensure the same level of focus and accountability within your business?

Revisiting “The Calm before the Storm!”

Tuesday, August 9th, 2011

Fifteen months ago, in June of 2010, I wrote a magazine column, The Calm before the Storm! In it I suggested that despite the economic upswing, a debt-induced financial crisis loomed and could cause tough times in 2011. I also offered eleven steps one could take to strengthen their business foundation and prepare for a downturn. This may be an appropriate time to revisit the eleven steps, and evaluate which of them you can employ to help bullet-proof your business. While implementing these strategies back when they were first presented would have helped you to better maximize them, it’s certainly better to do so late than never.

 Please read and share with those whom might benefit from the suggested actions. The article link is here: http://budurl.com/q2k3

Excuses, Mediocrity & How to Rise Above Them!

Friday, July 22nd, 2011

A clear sign of leadership maturity is the willingness to take responsibility. One aspect of this virtue is refusing to make excuses for personal failures or for those of others. I readily admit that listening while others blame is one of my pet peeves. Little rubs me rawer than when someone attempts to defend failed actions or inferior results by compromising, sanitizing, or trivializing the truth. Occasionally, I must endure the whininess in person at one of my workshops, as a leader goes to great lengths to defend why he’s keeping “five-car Fred” on the payroll. In other instances, it’s a self-righteous lecture I occasionally receive via email from a reader in denial. I rarely have time to respond to the complainers anymore. Over the years, replying to their reasoning has drained far too much time. I may be a slow learner, but I have picked up on the fact that people who rationalize failure are practically un-coachable and mostly unchangeable.

 Excuses for failure remind me of a quote I heard and embraced years ago: “Excuses are the DNA of underachievers.” This same speaker went on to say that living in denial makes you a prisoner of wrong actions and outdated beliefs since it is impossible to change what you don’t acknowledge. Most would agree that excuses are a prime contributor to mediocrity. When you begin to explain away why you, or others, failed to deliver results, you become quite ordinary and blend into a crowded mass of mediocre souls slogging through life, all the while complaining that they haven’t caught the breaks or are victims of bad press or perceptions. In their sanctimonious minds, they are simply misunderstood. But what they fail to understand is that success, and failures, are not accidents. You either set yourself up for them or you don’t. Successes and failures both result from a series of choices and actions one makes over time, of sowing and reaping. While one may catch a good or bad break occasionally, over the course of a lifetime, you don’t succeed or fail by chance.

Those who become mediocre in their thinking, actions, and results, forego the opportunity to turn their fortunes around by shifting their focus to making better decisions and taking wiser action. Instead, they continue to bemoan conditions and render themselves powerless to affect their own futures. If you look up the dictionary’s definition for “mediocre,” it says: moderate to inferior in quality; ordinary. This definition reflects an accurate picture of what happens when one engages in the blame game.

 If you’ve succumbed to the blaming habit, you’re in grave danger of becoming “moderate to inferior,” if you haven’t descended into that state already. Here are five thoughts concerning mediocrity to help you, or someone you care about, right your course and stay on a path of personal responsibility that elevates your self-worth, the value you bring to others, and to your organization.

  1. Mediocrity begins with “me.” It is not something that someone or something does to you. It is a result of choices you’ve made, conditions you’ve accepted, or wrong actions you’ve taken.
  2. Mediocrity is a personal concession to less than your best. What the mediocre are really saying is, “this is good enough so deal with it.” When you substitute excuses for results, you are boldly making this concession and resigning yourself to living out a career and life that’s “good enough” rather than the best it can be.
  3. You break free from mediocrity by making better decisions, not by waiting for more favorable conditions. This should encourage you, because while you cannot control conditions, you do have control over your decisions.  
  4. Living in denial prolongs your marriage with mediocrity. If you don’t face it, you cannot fix it. The box you’ve put yourself in will one day become a casket. 
  5. Make your break with any mediocre aspect of your life by deciding to do the following:
    • Put away your black belt in blame and accept responsibility for your results. Understand that one of the best days of your life is the day that you renounce excuses, grow up, and become a man or woman of responsibility and accountability. 
    • Stop defending mediocrity in others on your team, and face reality about their skills, talent, discipline, attitude, or character. Only when you first see people as they really are can you help them become what they’re meant to be.
    • Commit to personal development so that you elevate the quality of your thinking, and are able to make better personal choices concerning your own attitude, character choices, application of knowledge, and strengthening of discipline.
    • Get clearer about what you want and then resolve to pay the price to achieve it; deciding up front that you’ll ditch the excuses and hold yourself accountable for results.

 One of the saddest epitaphs for many who choose to lead mediocre lives will be that when they die it will be as though they never lived. But what’s sadder yet is that when the sweat of their death bed wakes them up to the fact that they’ve missed their life, they’ll be haunted by the classic lament of life’s biggest underachievers: “I could have, I should have, if only I would have.”

 Each day you have two choices: performance or excuses. Choose well, it becomes your legacy.

Until You’re Perfect, It’s Not Redundant!

Monday, June 27th, 2011

While managing salespeople I would occasionally hear a complaint from team members that sounded like this:

We’re going to train on the steps to the sale again? This is getting redundant!

While helping to run a six-dealership automotive group, I would sometimes hear a complaint from members of the management team that expressed the following:

Our training this month is on how to hire and interview…again? This is getting redundant.

As a speaker and trainer who produces monthly training dvds, and gives one thousand training sessions for clients each decade, I have from time to time heard this complaint from a customer:

What have you got that’s new? Topics like holding people accountable, casting vision for your organization, developing your leadership skills, setting the right expectations, learning how to interview and the like is getting a bit redundant.

To fully understand how inane these laments are, try to imagine the following conversations ever taking place: 

Tiger Woods to his coach: I have to hit ten buckets of balls again today? This is getting redundant!

Tom Brady to Coach Bill Belichick: We have to practice the same six pass routes gain today? This is getting redundant!

 Cy Young Award winner, Roy Halladay, whining to his manager, I have to practice the same five pitches again today? This is getting redundant!

Every serious professional in any endeavor knows, embraces, and applies this important performance rule: Until you’re perfect, it’s not redundant!

The reason I continue to speak, write and expand upon leadership themes like character, discipline, hiring, accountability and vision, is because so many of the leaders I know still fail miserably in these endeavors and their organizations suffer substantial consequences. And this is exactly why you must relentlessly hammer certain non-negotiable training topics throughout your organization. After all, it’s not the brilliance of your plan, but the consistency of right actions that creates performance breakthroughs. Here are some thoughts to help you inculcate this mindset into your culture.

1. The “It’s gotten redundant” excuse is normally whined out by lazy, arrogant, overrated employees who overestimate their ability while you underestimate what they’re costing you with their “been there, done that, I have arrived,” mentality. Tell them that once they’re perfect, they can stop practicing, but until that day they’re going to keep working at the essential disciplines you deem as non-negotiable. You’re not offering them “multiple choices,” but a condition of employment.

 2. No one on your team has to do anything extraordinary to reach the next performance level, but they will need to do the ordinary things extraordinarily well, and that comes only through practice and repetition.

 3. Lack of knowledge is not what is holding you or your team members back from better results. For the most part you know full well what to do but you’re still not doing it! Until you discipline yourself to close the gap between knowing and doing you’ll fail to reach your fullest potential.

4. Consistency of execution is what separates the good from the great. Anyone can be brilliant in the basics occasionally. That’s not special or worthy of acclaim. To be the best you must consistently do more of what you know to do and do so even when you don’t feel like it; on the bad days, when it’s not easy, cheap, popular or convenient. 

5. If you are the leader, and you accept the “this is getting redundant” excuses from your sniveling team members, then you are the problem. Sadly, you’ve attracted whiners and wannabes in your own image, and your attempts to correct their errors will be considered as hypocritical and ineffective. You’ll need to step up and pay the price personally before you can raise the bar for your team.

6. The level of your practice determines your level of play. If your performance isn’t what is should be, it indicts and convicts your practice ethic.

7. Stop letting “good enough” get in the way of becoming great. Some of your team members have reached a level that they—and you—consider as “good enough.” This plateau has removed any pressure, urgency or incentive from continuing to stretch, learn, and train in order to become great.

Here are three of my favorite quotes on preparation and paying the price for success. You may find it useful to post them in your conference room and point to them when the perennial pretenders on your team complain about your efforts to improve them:

Successful people have made the habit of doing things that failures don’t like to do. Successful people don’t like to do these things either. But they subordinate their dislike to the strength of their purpose.  The strength of their purpose propels the successful to their dreams, forcing them to do the things they don’t really want to do so they can obtain the things they deeply want to achieve. E. M. Gray

You can put together a fight plan or a life plan, but when the action starts, you’re down to your reflexes. That’s when your practice shows. And if you cheated on your practice in the dark of the morning, you’ll be found out under the bright light of the competition. Joe Frazier

A champion doesn’t become a champion in the ring; he is merely recognized in the ring. The “becoming” happens during his daily routine. Joe Louis

The Truth about Potential!

Monday, June 13th, 2011

A top reason an under-performer is kept on a payroll despite failing to realize results is because his or her manager touts the person’s “high potential.” This is notwithstanding the fact that the employee has accomplished little or nothing of significance in their job up to that point.

While it is important to have employees with high potential, continually touting someone’s potential is normally an indication that the person hasn’t actually done much yet. The dictionary’s definition of potential bears this out: a latent excellence or ability that may or may not be developed; possible, as opposed to actual. To fully appreciate the implications of this definition, it’s also helpful to grasp how latent is defined: potentially existing but not presently evident or realized.

Have you or your managers been hiding behind “potential” as a means to rationalize keeping someone who does not presently add value to your team? Consider the following four thoughts in this regard:

1. Potential is common. In fact, it can be confidently stated that everyone has potential at something.

2. Unfulfilled potential is nearly as common as potential itself. The world abounds with those who, on their deathbed, are haunted by personal confessions like, “I could have,” “I should have,” “if only I would have.” Calvin Coolidge nailed it when he said: “The most common commodity in this country is unrealized potential.”

3. Continually falling short of one’s potential may indicate serious flaws within an individual: lack of drive, passion, character, discipline, focus, work ethic, energy, or persistence. Someone who cannot develop or control these aspects of their lives will normally require enormous amounts of management time and energy as their leaders beg, threaten, and regularly pump up a laggard with “potential” in order to get them to do their jobs. To once again quote Coolidge: Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan ‘Press On’ has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race. As author Liane Cordes observed, “Continuous effort – not strength or intelligence – is the key to unlocking our potential.”

4. You are expected to work with someone according to their potential for a period of time, but eventually you must work with them in accordance with their performance. In other words, there comes a day when people with potential must stop belching out the baloney and bring home the bacon. How long should you work with someone according to their potential depends upon several factors. Common sense is more useful here than a cut and dry, pre-established cut-off date. Here are three guidelines:

A. Even if the person is not growing as fast as you’d like, do you see measurable progress in reasonable periods of time. and without “one step forward and two steps back” regressions? If so, continue investing in the employee.

B. What is holding them back: teachable or unteachable deficiencies? Both knowledge and skills related to job competence can be developed through training. But if they lack “inside” traits related to their character, drive or attitude, there is little you can do to influence these factors in a meaningful way. You should cut your losses and redirect your energies into finding and developing people who possess those vital critical success factors.

C. Has your management team done its job to create a culture conducive to developing the potential of others? An employee may have a bag filled with fertile seed, but the seed in their bag won’t produce a harvest unless there is fertile ground in which to sow. Creating this environment includes duties like setting clear expectations, ongoing training and coaching, and a value system that rewards results over tenure, experience, and best efforts. It is the responsibility of your leadership team to: select employees with the “right stuff” in the first place, and then draw out those assets in order to make up the difference between where someone is currently and where they have the potential to grow. In the absence of fulfilling these responsibilities, discarding someone for failing to perform is reckless and unfair.

The Nike slogan, “Just do it” never resonated with me, because it smacked of procrastination. “Just do it” indicates that you haven’t done anything yet. In order for each of us to move forward in our jobs and in life, we must move from “just do it’ to “just did it.” The same holds true for the underachieving high potentials that remain on your team. It’s on your watch that they continue to waste resources and opportunities, relegating you more of an enabler than a leader as you preside over their mediocrity and abet the diminishment of your enterprise.

Does Your Organization Sell Experiences?

Friday, June 3rd, 2011

I recently wrote a magazine article entitled, “You Can’t Build a Great Organization Around Satisfied Customers.” In that piece I explained how, by definition, a satisfied customer has merely had their expectations met. Period. He is not wowed or impressed. Because of this, satisfied customers are not loyal; they are indifferent and apathetic. According to data published by Service Management Group, who surveyed millions of customers across multiple industries, less than 50% of satisfied customers return to do business with you and fewer than 30% recommend your business to others. Thus if your goal is to simply “satisfy the customer,” you may win some battles but will lose the war.

On the other hand, customers who have been wowed or impressed during the purchase experience rose into the ranks classified as highly satisfied. These customers are loyal, they support you and want to see you become more successful. As compared to satisfied customers, twice as many in this group return to do business again, and three times the number refer others to you. This begs the question: how do you move a customer from being satisfied—having their expectation met—to becoming loyal, wowed and impressed? The answer is found largely in the experience you provide for the customer during and following the purchase. As companies like Ritz Carlton can attest, as well as consumers who fly upper class on Virgin Atlantic Airlines, people pay more for great experiences, and are very likely to return for more of the same.

Sadly, most organizations create uninspired, stressful and underwhelming buying experiences. They install processes, people and policies that facilitate transactions, but fail to favorably raise a customer’s eyebrows throughout any aspect of the encounter. In fact, many consumers have given up looking for great car buying experiences and settle instead for those they believe will be less bad.

What’s atrocious is that while 79% of surveyed customers rated their buying experience as average or below, 80% of the companies providing said experiences acclaimed the service they provided as superior! In other words, denial rules!

How about you? Does your business merely facilitate transactions or do you wow and impress customers throughout their relationship with you? Following are questions that will help you determine the real answer:

1. How often does the leadership of your organization speak in terms of creating a great customer experience? If you focus strictly on “getting the deal done,” and moving on to the next one, you are transaction focused. This enslaves you to high ad budgets designed to help you purchase new customers to replace those you are unable to retain. The only time that you’re likely to wow or impress a customer is when they drive past your enterprise and notice that you’re still in business.

2. Do you hire people who genuinely appreciate value and care about other people? These traits are normally rooted in an individual’s character. Disney is famously fussy about whom they allow on their team to care for their customers. Walt Disney was once asked why everyone working at Disneyland was so happy. His reply, “We don’t hire grumpy people.” If your staffing strategy is to hire whoever is cheap, available or easy, don’t be surprised when the experiences they create for customers elicit smirks, yawns or curses.

3. Do you hire people with competence, and train them to become even more so? While having employees with great attitudes is essential, attitude isn’t a substitute for competence. How tragic that so many organizations defend and retain loveable losers; those nice folks who haven’t a clue how to consistently perform their job with excellence, much less the skills or talent to do so. If you hire recklessly and then regard training as an expense versus an investment, it’s safe to say that your team is creating plenty of customer apathy towards your operation, and a steady stream of prospects for your competition.

4. Do you hire people with the character to keep commitments, tell the truth and the humility to joyfully serve both customers and teammates? If not, it’s quite likely that you don’t even have a team per se, but a band of mercenaries proficient at creating mundane and miserable experiences for co-workers and consumers alike.

5. Have you created a sales and service environment worthy of your product’s price tag? If your people dress like That 70’s Show, speak like street thugs, and your offices mimic thrift store horns of plenty? Your underwhelmed customers will buy solely on price since they see no value in paying more for a relationship with a company run more like a circus than a business.

6. Do you have customer-friendly processes that demonstrate a high regard for your customer’s time? It is impossible to create impressive experiences when you waste a customer’s time through process inefficiencies, employee incompetence or the failure to engage and occupy them during prolonged periods of waiting for the next step in your antiquated process.

7. Do you have thorough and personalized sales and service processes that help your business extend an initial sale into a long-term relationship? Is your personnel held accountable for using the CRM assets you provide for them? Have you installed internal flagging protocols to identify your best sales and service customers so that you can relate to them and reward their loyalty in a more meaningful way? Is your employee retention high enough to enable you to retain a substantial percentage of your customers? Frankly, if you’re not creating valuable long-term experiences for the customers you already have, why should your place of business be blessed with additional customers to abuse?

8. Do you consistently execute these points and others like them that contribute to the customer experience? Your goal must be to remove variation from the customer experience. This can only be accomplished when you hire right, and install strong processes and policies that align with your goal of wowing and impressing customers in order to move them from the uninspiring rank of “satisfied” to the loftier objective of highly satisfied.

Incidentally, the underlying key to creating a great customer experience is to first create a great employee experience, because only highly satisfied employees can earn highly satisfied customers.

My books, columns and articles in dozens of publications over the past 12 years have provided ample ammo to help you achieve this end. Thus, the question is not whether you know what to do in this regard, but whether or not you do it. And before you get smug and believe that because you rarely hear a customer complaint that you are God’s gift to your customer you should consider that statistically, only 6% of customers complain. Thus, silence doesn’t imply delight! Nor should you allow the CSI scores that you coach, cajole, or otherwise bribe customers to complete in your favor are a fair reflection of your ability to create great customer experiences.

The truest way to measure the quality of the experiences you create for customers is found in your ability to do three things:

1. Retain significant percentages of your customers and earn their referrals.

2. Have margins that testify to the fact that customers see significant value in the sales and service experience you create, and are willing to pay more to do it.

3. Your ability to consistently spend less on advertising than your competitors, since your wowed customers serve as your unpaid sales force.

Do You Over-manage & Under-lead?

Saturday, May 21st, 2011

One of the most common mistakes that prevents a manager from reaching his or her potential is to over-manage and under-lead. Many of the managers I’ve met over the years don’t even realize that there is a difference between management and leadership, or that developing a balance of both skill sets is essential if they want to grow their team and maximize results. While I can’t explain as well in a few hundred words what takes me two hours to cover in my workshop, I’ll do my best in this space to outline a handful of key differences between management and leadership. Evaluate your own tendencies, and determine if there are adjustments you should make that will help you to optimize your leadership effectiveness.

Think of management as being about paperwork, while leadership concerns people-work. Management involves systems, controls, budgets, forecasting, scheduling, processes and procedures. On the other hand, the focus of leadership is to attract and develop talent, motivate, create vision and values, and build a team that can succeed in your absence. I explain to the attendees of my workshops that there are two categories of tasks you can engage in every day: “stuff” or people. Frankly, management is the stuff part of your job, and it’s so easy to become consumed by that aspect of your daily responsibilities that you have little or no time left for people. A consequence for building an organization that is over-managed & under-led is that the team is likely to be under-developed & overwhelmed.

Management and leadership are equally important. Don’t get the idea that “management” is a bad word. The problem comes when you over-manage, and spend so much time with stuff that you become isolated, aloof, out of touch, and stop impacting your people. The reason I’ve spent so much time over the years writing about and teaching leadership is that it’s the skill set that most managers have had little training in. They get schooled on how to do the “stuff” part of the job (data entry, inventories, forecasts, budgets, scheduling, reading financial statements, etc.) but don’t have a clue how to recruit, interview, motivate, cast a vision, hold someone accountable, or mentor.  While it is common to over-manage and under-lead, it is also possible to over-lead and under-manage. Think about it this way: management without leadership means that you won’t be able to grow what you keep, whereas leadership without management means you won’t be able to keep what you grow.

Here are three of the twenty key differences between managers and leaders that I discuss in my seminars to help attendees become more aware of what they’re doing well, and where they need to make adjustments in their daily approach to leadership:

1. Managers maintain whereas leaders stretch. Managers are decent at maintaining people, but they’re not great at growing them because they don’t spend enough time with them, and were never trained how to evaluate or develop human capital in the first place. They don’t seem to realize that while you can impress people at a distance (in your fancy office), to impact them you must get up close. Leaders, on the other hand, are committed to leaving followers better than they found them. They stretch them out of their comfort zone, provide the tools and personal touch their team members need to grow to their potential, and hold them accountable for results.

2. Managers lead from the rear, leaders lead from the front. Because they are enamored with “stuff,” managers spend more time in their offices getting dazed by data and numbed by numbers, than they do in the trenches acting as a catalyst and unleashing the potential of their team. As they pencil-whip budgets and count beans in an attempt to turn the numbers around, they fail to develop their human capital—turn the people around—so that their people can turn the numbers around. These folks talk like leaders but act like anchors. On the other hand, leaders spend more time charting the course than they do charting results. They focus on what’s happening in the arena and on the horizon, because they know that the front line determines the bottom line.

3. Managers resist change and defend the status quo; leaders rattle the status quo and change before they have to. Managers who spend a good part of their day roosting in an office, surrounded by stuff, or suffering through hours of death-by-meeting, devolve into a defensive posture where they spend more time plugging holes, doing damage control, and reacting than they do initiating change. However, when they lead in the trenches with their people, they see more clearly what needs to be changed and are quicker to take action. Too many leaders, who were successful at one time because they lead from the front and acted as a change agent, gradually withdrew from their catalyst role and begin presiding and administering from their backside. They regress from active to passive; from “lead,” a verb, to “leadership,” a noun. During this regression, they descend from risk taker, to care taker, to undertaker, eventually presiding over a lifeless enterprise that became comatose on their watch.

If you over-manage and under-lead in areas like the three I’ve presented, don’t beat yourself up. After all, we all get off track. What’s important is that you become a more self-aware leader who makes faster adjustments when you stray from a sound leadership style so that your temporary detour doesn’t lead you into a rut which, if you stay in it long enough, becomes a grave.

The Pursuit of Wisdom

Saturday, April 9th, 2011

You become what you pursue. That being said, what are you chasing: worldly wisdom and activities, trivial amusements to help you pass the time, or God’s wisdom so that you can maximize your life and organization’s results? Below are important thoughts on the topic of pursuing wisdom from Boyd Bailey’s daily Wisdom Hunter’s devotional. Enjoy and prosper!

“If any of you lacks wisdom, you should ask God, who gives generously to all without finding fault, and it will be given to you. But when you ask, you must believe and not doubt.” James 1:5-6a

Pursuit. It is what we all experience. We pursue dreams, we pursue jobs, we pursue opportunities, we pursue a husband or a wife, we pursue hobbies, we pursue friends, we pursue adventure, we pursue good health, we pursue success, we pursue significance and we pursue happiness—to name a few of our positive pursuits. Indeed, what we pursue becomes the focus of what we do.

Pursuit is stated clearly as a priority in the United States Declaration of Independence: “Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness”. Over the course of history, the human race as a whole, would agree that the pursuit of good things is an inalienable right of individuals. Conversely, we can choose to chase after unhealthy pursuits like: greed, lust, power and pride. Wise pursuits facilitate good outcomes, while foolish pursuits produce bad results.

“The wise inherit honor, but fools get only shame” (Proverbs 3:35).

Our pursuits make up who we are, thus it’s important that we pursue the right things. If you were honest, would a pursuit of wisdom make the top ten list of your life’s pursuits? Ask God if wisdom is His priority for your pursuits. If wisdom is the knowledge of what’s right and the judgment to rightly act on that knowledge, then anyone is capable of learning and applying wisdom. Perhaps—based on the day of the month—you begin by daily reading one of the 31 chapters in Proverbs. God gives wisdom to believing seekers.

“For the foolishness of God is wiser than human wisdom, and the weakness of God is stronger than human strength” (1 Corinthians 1:25).

Does the pursuit of wisdom motivate your actions? Is it a part of your portfolio of pursuits? If not, consider moving it up toward the top of your list. After all, wise-decision making affects all of your other pursuits. It could be argued that a life full of wisdom will lead to the most fulfilling life, but a life void of wisdom sets the stage for foolish living. What we pursue becomes the focus of what we do, so endeavor to seek God’s wisdom.

“Cynics look high and low for wisdom—and never find it; the open-minded find it right on their doorstep” (Proverbs 14:6, The Message)!

Seven Truths about Tests!

Sunday, March 13th, 2011

Everyone goes through tests in life. In fact, the biographies of famous men and women often highlight tests as catalysts for breakthroughs in the life of a highly accomplished person.

The Bible is also filled with stories of tests God put His people through in an effort to make them more usable for His purposes. This morning’s reading of Wisdom Hunters shed insightful light into life’s tests, and provoked the following seven takeaways I’ll share here:

1. What’s in our heart comes out under duress. If resentment resides in your heart, then anger appears. If forgiveness is found in your heart, then peace exudes when pressured by outside forces. The heart does not show its true colors until it faces a test.

2. It is under the fire of a test that the heart of the matter surfaces to the top. This is why someone is able to mask hurt over a lifetime of disappointment by ignoring its deep-rooted influence. You can hide what’s in your heart, but eventually a test will lure it out. And, its exposure is for your benefit. It makes you aware of the inner work you need to deal with to grow as a person.�
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3. During a period of testing, you may not gain more materially (in fact you may temporarily lose ground in this area), but you will become more personally. This becoming more prepares you for bigger and better opportunities.

4. Your current situation may very well be a test from God. He is squeezing your heart to see what is inside. It is healthy to flush out deceptive feelings that may be leading you to be fearful and to distrust. �
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5. One of the greatest benefits of testing will reveal that you have not developed spiritually, and still depend too much on yourself and worldly resources. The test can drive you closer to God through more intense worship and obedience. 

6. Persisting through a test in your own strength can jolt you into reality. You now have a desperate and fresh dependence on God. He is front and center in your thinking. The carousel of careless living has stopped, and you are dizzy with despair. It is at this point of dependence on God where you need to camp out. God’s test may be designed to separate you from your pride, shake you out of denial, and purge you from your comfort zone.

7. Your test may come through abundance rather than through lack. Perhaps, your wealth has exceeded all limits and expectations. Will you give it away or hoard it; stockpile worldly wealth or pile up heavenly treasures? This is a test of what is truly in your heart. Your prosperity can compete with your obedience to God, or it can accelerate it. Use the heavenly test of abundance for the transformation of your earthly thinking.

8. Your test may be to help you discover what motivates you. One reason that bad things happen to good people is to enable them to uncover their true motives and motivations. Tests are for a season. Tests are for a reason. Tests purify. Tests mature. Tests bless. Tests are for your good.

Day 151-155 How to Lead by THE BOOK: How to Fish for Men!

Saturday, December 11th, 2010

How to Lead by THE BOOK: Proverbs, Parables & Principles to Tackle Your Fourteen Toughest Business Challenges is finished! In fact, my outstanding team has completely proofed and formatted it so that it is ready to Fed-Ex to our publisher on Tuesday for Wednesday delivery. This will hit the deadline on the nose!

In my next post, I’ll include the Dedication and Acknowledgments that will appear in the book to recognize the special team of influencers and friends that helped me complete this work. For now, I want to share an excerpt from “Closing Thoughts.” These are the last pages of the book that include my final words to the readers:

Closing Thoughts

Billions of dollars are spent each year to research why people behave in the dark manner they do, and why the world is in so much trouble. It is not an oversimplification to answer that we have lost our will to submit to God and His ways. A Christian who does not submit to God is not much different than an atheist. While it can be argued that many atheists refuse to acknowledge the existence of God so they have an excuse to submit only to themselves and become their own god, what is a Christian’s explanation for disobedience? If you believe in God but do not obey Him, are you more useful to Him than one who does not believe at all? Evangelist Charles Spurgeon wisely observed: “Worldly people may be of some use even if they fail in certain respects, but a counterfeit Christian is no longer good for anything, utterly useless to anybody and everybody” (Carter 1998, 106).

As this book concludes, here are two fair questions to consider. In your daily walk at work, in your community, church and home, do you live your life in a way that makes you a fisher of men, or is your life as a Christian failing to turn heads? Do you understand exactly what that means to be a fisher of men? It is exciting indeed!

In Jesus’ day, fishing was much different than now. Fishermen, like Peter, Andrew, John and James, would fish at night by shining lights into the water to attract fish. Once the fish were drawn to the light, they would drop their nets on them and sweep them into their boats. Thus, Jesus’ command from Matthew 4:19, “Follow Me and I’ll make you fishers of men,” takes on new meaning.  Jesus wants us to act as a light in the world that draws others to Him, through our actions, attitude, character, and love.

When you first meet Jesus, you begin to reflect His light. But after you place Him at the center of your life, build an intimate relationship, and follow His commands, you emit direct light that draws others to you and to Christ. This is exactly what Jesus meant when He declared, “You are the salt of the earth” in Matthew 5:13. Salt creates a thirst. When you lead and live by THE BOOK at work in all areas of your life, you provoke a thirst in others that can only be quenched as they come to Christ’s living water (Gothard 2005).

Thus, it is important to aspire to this lifestyle as described by FB Meyer: “We ought to be Christians in large type, so that it would not be necessary for others to be long in our society, or to regard us through spectacles, in order to detect our true discipleship. The message of our lives should resemble the big advertisements which can be read on the street by all who pass by” (Richards 1990).

Aspire to be a “Christian in large type!” Remember what Jesus told us in Matthew 5:14: “You are the light of the world. A city that is set on a hill cannot be hidden. Nor do they light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a lamp stand and it gives light to all who are in the house. Let your light so shine before men that they may see your good works and glorify your Father in heaven.”

Thank you for taking this journey through How to Lead by THE BOOK with me. I have no doubt that there were sections that challenged you, even perhaps that you disagreed with. The fact that you persisted despite potential differences demonstrates a Christ-like attitude that celebrates unity, and a willingness to focus on what we have in common rather than on what makes us different.

May God guide you as you continue your Christian journey to live and love like Jesus in all sectors of your life; to be light; to be salt; to subordinate your own wisdom, desires, and agenda; and submit to our all-powerful and flawless Lord.