Posts Tagged ‘how to lead by the book’

Do You Over-manage & Under-lead?

Saturday, May 21st, 2011

One of the most common mistakes that prevents a manager from reaching his or her potential is to over-manage and under-lead. Many of the managers I’ve met over the years don’t even realize that there is a difference between management and leadership, or that developing a balance of both skill sets is essential if they want to grow their team and maximize results. While I can’t explain as well in a few hundred words what takes me two hours to cover in my workshop, I’ll do my best in this space to outline a handful of key differences between management and leadership. Evaluate your own tendencies, and determine if there are adjustments you should make that will help you to optimize your leadership effectiveness.

Think of management as being about paperwork, while leadership concerns people-work. Management involves systems, controls, budgets, forecasting, scheduling, processes and procedures. On the other hand, the focus of leadership is to attract and develop talent, motivate, create vision and values, and build a team that can succeed in your absence. I explain to the attendees of my workshops that there are two categories of tasks you can engage in every day: “stuff” or people. Frankly, management is the stuff part of your job, and it’s so easy to become consumed by that aspect of your daily responsibilities that you have little or no time left for people. A consequence for building an organization that is over-managed & under-led is that the team is likely to be under-developed & overwhelmed.

Management and leadership are equally important. Don’t get the idea that “management” is a bad word. The problem comes when you over-manage, and spend so much time with stuff that you become isolated, aloof, out of touch, and stop impacting your people. The reason I’ve spent so much time over the years writing about and teaching leadership is that it’s the skill set that most managers have had little training in. They get schooled on how to do the “stuff” part of the job (data entry, inventories, forecasts, budgets, scheduling, reading financial statements, etc.) but don’t have a clue how to recruit, interview, motivate, cast a vision, hold someone accountable, or mentor.  While it is common to over-manage and under-lead, it is also possible to over-lead and under-manage. Think about it this way: management without leadership means that you won’t be able to grow what you keep, whereas leadership without management means you won’t be able to keep what you grow.

Here are three of the twenty key differences between managers and leaders that I discuss in my seminars to help attendees become more aware of what they’re doing well, and where they need to make adjustments in their daily approach to leadership:

1. Managers maintain whereas leaders stretch. Managers are decent at maintaining people, but they’re not great at growing them because they don’t spend enough time with them, and were never trained how to evaluate or develop human capital in the first place. They don’t seem to realize that while you can impress people at a distance (in your fancy office), to impact them you must get up close. Leaders, on the other hand, are committed to leaving followers better than they found them. They stretch them out of their comfort zone, provide the tools and personal touch their team members need to grow to their potential, and hold them accountable for results.

2. Managers lead from the rear, leaders lead from the front. Because they are enamored with “stuff,” managers spend more time in their offices getting dazed by data and numbed by numbers, than they do in the trenches acting as a catalyst and unleashing the potential of their team. As they pencil-whip budgets and count beans in an attempt to turn the numbers around, they fail to develop their human capital—turn the people around—so that their people can turn the numbers around. These folks talk like leaders but act like anchors. On the other hand, leaders spend more time charting the course than they do charting results. They focus on what’s happening in the arena and on the horizon, because they know that the front line determines the bottom line.

3. Managers resist change and defend the status quo; leaders rattle the status quo and change before they have to. Managers who spend a good part of their day roosting in an office, surrounded by stuff, or suffering through hours of death-by-meeting, devolve into a defensive posture where they spend more time plugging holes, doing damage control, and reacting than they do initiating change. However, when they lead in the trenches with their people, they see more clearly what needs to be changed and are quicker to take action. Too many leaders, who were successful at one time because they lead from the front and acted as a change agent, gradually withdrew from their catalyst role and begin presiding and administering from their backside. They regress from active to passive; from “lead,” a verb, to “leadership,” a noun. During this regression, they descend from risk taker, to care taker, to undertaker, eventually presiding over a lifeless enterprise that became comatose on their watch.

If you over-manage and under-lead in areas like the three I’ve presented, don’t beat yourself up. After all, we all get off track. What’s important is that you become a more self-aware leader who makes faster adjustments when you stray from a sound leadership style so that your temporary detour doesn’t lead you into a rut which, if you stay in it long enough, becomes a grave.

Seven Quotes: How to Lead by THE BOOK

Thursday, February 10th, 2011

The seven quotes for the back cover of, How to Lead by THE BOOK: Proverbs, Parables & Principles to Tackle Your Toughest Business Challenges are in! Take a look below and see if you know any of these special friends who agreed to read and review my book for me. I appreciate their time and generosity. Their input will add great value to the book!

If you’re looking for no nonsense answers to help you fix, build, or stretch your organization, How to Lead by THE BOOK hits the bullseye! This book is a home run!

John C. Maxwell, Leadership Expert and Best-selling Author. 

How to Lead by THE BOOK is filled with refreshing, uncommon candor. Each chapter provides pragmatic applications to help Christian leaders tackle today’s most common leadership challenges. I found as many applications for how we manage our home and family as I do in managing our company. Reading this book humbly reminds me of my servant leadership responsibilities to my colleagues.

Ed Bastian, President of Delta Airlines 

 Our nation is at a crossroads.  We are experiencing a call to leadership in our country today in business, in politics and in our families.  Many have offered different visions to follow but there can be only one.  How to Lead by THE BOOK lays out the true path to authentic leadership that has been tested and found to be true for eons.  I highly recommend this book.

Chad Hennings, Super Bowl Champion, author, Rules of Engagement

How to Lead by THE BOOK offers a refreshing return to highly effective, eternal success principles. The biblically-based strategies Dave provides to your fourteen toughest challenges have never been more necessary or relevant.

Jon Gordon, Best-selling author of The Energy Bus and Soup

In a world of constant change, stability comes from living the values that don’t change.  This is as true for companies as it is for the individuals who work in them.  In How to Lead by THE BOOK Dave Anderson reminds us that some values are timeless, regardless of the times we live in.

Joe Calloway, author, Becoming A Category of One

Renowned leadership authority Dave Anderson has made an extraordinary contribution with How to Lead by THE BOOK. This remarkable work can be of immediate-and enduring–value to anyone called upon to lead within a company, a not-for-profit, the military, a community or a family.

James Strock, author of Serve to Lead, and Reagan on Leadership

How to Lead by the Book is a no-nonsense approach to leadership for today’s leader. With insight from God’s Word, Dave addresses the issues that every leader faces on a daily basis and provides practical steps to bring health to any team. A must-read!

Todd Mullins, Lead Pastor Christ Fellowship Church, West Palm Gardens, Florida

New Book Previews & Article: “No Problem” is a Big Problem!

Thursday, January 27th, 2011

This month has flown by! Im traveling to Dallas tomorrow to speak at Goodyear’s annual convention at the Gaylord Texan–one of my favorite hotels. It will complete a twelve-speaking-day calendar in January, with a like schedule next month. Gotta love those frequent flyer miles!

Here are two quick updates on my upcoming books and a link to an article on customer service that you should read and apply immediately.

1. Amazon.com already has “How to Lead by THE BOOK” posted. It will be released June 21. Get a sneak preview here: http://budurl.com/hynn

2. Amazon.com also has the revised and expanded paperback version of “How to Run Your Business by THE BOOK” posted. It will also be released on June 21. Take a look: http://budurl.com/gzp6

3. My friend and Small Business Advocate Radio Show host Jiim Blasingame wrote an article called, “No Problem is a Big Problem!” It ties in very well with the Simply the Best Customer Service principles Ive been teaching in my new seminar. Read it and share it with your team. http://budurl.com/45dr 

Six of the nine expected cover-quote testimonials for How to Lead by THE BOOK are in. I should have the rest in a few days and I will share them with you next week!

Day 156-159 How to Lead by THE BOOK: The Finish! Dedication! Acknowledgments!

Tuesday, December 14th, 2010

I received word this morning that my publisher, Wiley, has received the Fed-Ex’d manuscript for How to Lead by THE BOOK: Proverbs, Parables & Principles to Tackle Your Fourteen Toughest Business Challenges–one day ahead of the December 15th deadline! Now, I can move on to revise and expand, How to Run Your Business by THE BOOK, with a deadline of February 15th.

Here’s how the process will now work with Wiley. They will do the following:

1. Read and review the book and make additional proofing changes as needed.

2. Make me aware of any objectionable content they would like me to soften or reconsider.

3. Send the manuscript back to me for final revisions.

In the opening pages of a book the author has an opportunity to write a “Dedication” and “Acknowledgments”. Here’s are the special people I’ve decided to include in this book:

Dedication

This book is dedicated to Jesus Christ and His persecuted followers in “closed” countries throughout the world, and to exceptional organizations like EQUIP, 222 Ministries, and Voice of the Martyrs who serve and support them.

Acknowledgements

It gives me great pleasure to acknowledge the following family, friends and co-laborers who have helped me with this book:

* To Rhonda, my wife and business partner. You are the love of my life and if you ever leave me, I am going with you!

* To Russell, for your exceptional work running LearnToLead with Rhonda so that I had the time to write this book.

* To Ryan for your diligent labors in proofing and formatting this book…and for tolerating the many, “Oh, by the way, could you add this to chapter so and so” after it was already complete.

* To Dan and Matt at Wiley for your enthusiasm and support for the By THE BOOK brand.

* To my beautiful and brilliant daughter Ashley, for your recommendations which I have happily included. How did you get so smart?

* To Christian giants of faith like Spurgeon, Simeon, Henry, and Gothard who have added incredible richness to my understanding of the Scriptures.

Now…I’ll get the manuscript to the kind folks who promised to consider writing a cover quote for the book, so they can begin to read it. I need to get all cover quotes to the publisher by February 1!

Day 151-155 How to Lead by THE BOOK: How to Fish for Men!

Saturday, December 11th, 2010

How to Lead by THE BOOK: Proverbs, Parables & Principles to Tackle Your Fourteen Toughest Business Challenges is finished! In fact, my outstanding team has completely proofed and formatted it so that it is ready to Fed-Ex to our publisher on Tuesday for Wednesday delivery. This will hit the deadline on the nose!

In my next post, I’ll include the Dedication and Acknowledgments that will appear in the book to recognize the special team of influencers and friends that helped me complete this work. For now, I want to share an excerpt from “Closing Thoughts.” These are the last pages of the book that include my final words to the readers:

Closing Thoughts

Billions of dollars are spent each year to research why people behave in the dark manner they do, and why the world is in so much trouble. It is not an oversimplification to answer that we have lost our will to submit to God and His ways. A Christian who does not submit to God is not much different than an atheist. While it can be argued that many atheists refuse to acknowledge the existence of God so they have an excuse to submit only to themselves and become their own god, what is a Christian’s explanation for disobedience? If you believe in God but do not obey Him, are you more useful to Him than one who does not believe at all? Evangelist Charles Spurgeon wisely observed: “Worldly people may be of some use even if they fail in certain respects, but a counterfeit Christian is no longer good for anything, utterly useless to anybody and everybody” (Carter 1998, 106).

As this book concludes, here are two fair questions to consider. In your daily walk at work, in your community, church and home, do you live your life in a way that makes you a fisher of men, or is your life as a Christian failing to turn heads? Do you understand exactly what that means to be a fisher of men? It is exciting indeed!

In Jesus’ day, fishing was much different than now. Fishermen, like Peter, Andrew, John and James, would fish at night by shining lights into the water to attract fish. Once the fish were drawn to the light, they would drop their nets on them and sweep them into their boats. Thus, Jesus’ command from Matthew 4:19, “Follow Me and I’ll make you fishers of men,” takes on new meaning.  Jesus wants us to act as a light in the world that draws others to Him, through our actions, attitude, character, and love.

When you first meet Jesus, you begin to reflect His light. But after you place Him at the center of your life, build an intimate relationship, and follow His commands, you emit direct light that draws others to you and to Christ. This is exactly what Jesus meant when He declared, “You are the salt of the earth” in Matthew 5:13. Salt creates a thirst. When you lead and live by THE BOOK at work in all areas of your life, you provoke a thirst in others that can only be quenched as they come to Christ’s living water (Gothard 2005).

Thus, it is important to aspire to this lifestyle as described by FB Meyer: “We ought to be Christians in large type, so that it would not be necessary for others to be long in our society, or to regard us through spectacles, in order to detect our true discipleship. The message of our lives should resemble the big advertisements which can be read on the street by all who pass by” (Richards 1990).

Aspire to be a “Christian in large type!” Remember what Jesus told us in Matthew 5:14: “You are the light of the world. A city that is set on a hill cannot be hidden. Nor do they light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a lamp stand and it gives light to all who are in the house. Let your light so shine before men that they may see your good works and glorify your Father in heaven.”

Thank you for taking this journey through How to Lead by THE BOOK with me. I have no doubt that there were sections that challenged you, even perhaps that you disagreed with. The fact that you persisted despite potential differences demonstrates a Christ-like attitude that celebrates unity, and a willingness to focus on what we have in common rather than on what makes us different.

May God guide you as you continue your Christian journey to live and love like Jesus in all sectors of your life; to be light; to be salt; to subordinate your own wisdom, desires, and agenda; and submit to our all-powerful and flawless Lord.

Day 144-146 How to Lead by THE BOOK: Your Three Biggest Threats!

Thursday, December 2nd, 2010

As the December 15th deadline looms for How to Lead by THE BOOK, I’m on track to finish right on time. I’ve got less than two full chapters to write, and my proofers and formatters are nearly caught up with what’ I’ve written thus far. The book will present a total of fifteen key organizational challenges, along with in-depth biblical remedies. Here is a preview of chapter 14:  What are the three biggest threats to my success?

Man’s Wisdom and Way

The business landscape is filled with mine fields: aggressive competition, government regulation, economic meltdowns and the like. These persistent threats are always circling like vultures, looking for an opportunity to devour your organization. To make matters worse, you remain vulnerable to the defection of big clients or top performers. And, in case that’s not enough, you’ll really discover what stress is all about the day the bank or your vendors  decides to withdraw your credit line! The combination of these forces and others like them is what should keep you on your toes and prevent you from ever becoming too comfortable. They loom as the biggest, most persistent threats to your success.

The BOOK’s Wisdom and Way

The threats triggered by adverse outside conditions mentioned above in “Man’s Wisdom and Way” are genuine. But the biggest threats to your organization do not come from the outside; they come from within. Often, they manifest from within the character of the leaders in charge of the organization. While the impact of adverse outside conditions is important and cannot be ignored, a leader can marginalize the effects of such factors by making the right “inside decisions” and character choices. On the other hand, poor character decisions by a leader can “train wreck” their organizations despite how robust and favorable outside conditions happen to be.

While there is a seemingly endless menu of possible poor character choices a leader can make that cause personal and organizational self-destruction, this chapter will focus on three of the “majors:” greed, sexual immorality, and following false teachers and their ungodly counsel.

Day 141-143 How to Lead by THE BOOK: When the Leader Sleeps the Followers Follow!

Monday, November 29th, 2010

I’m flying to Boston today to give a speech on, “Six Decisions that Create Success in Any Market!” tomorrow at a convention. It’s one of my favorite keynote topics, because it prompts leaders to look in the mirror and focus on decisions, rather than conditions.  I’ll do much of the same throughout How to Lead by THE BOOK. In fact, I’ve devoted an entire chapter to the importance of leaders holding themselves, and the other leaders within their organization, more accountable in this regard. Here is an excerpt that many readers will be able to relate to:

When the leader sleeps, the team follows

Peter’s name is mentioned in the Gospels more than any other name except Jesus. He was the disciple’s leader and a member of Jesus’ inner circle along with John and James. In Mark 14: 32, Jesus and the disciples had just finished the Last Supper, sang a hymn and went out to the Mount of Olives. While there, Jesus told them that they would all be made to stumble because of Him that night. Despite Peter’s protests, Jesus predicted that Peter would deny Him three times that very evening. Thus, as they ventured into the Garden of Gethsemane, there was probably a lot on all of their minds.

Then they came to a place which was named Gethsemane; and He said to His disciples, “Sit here while I pray.” And He took Peter, James and John with Him, and He began to be troubled and deeply distressed. Then He said to them, “my soul is exceedingly sorrowful, even to the death. Stay here and watch.”

He went a little farther, and fell on the ground, and prayed that if it were possible, the hour might pass from Him. And He said, “Abba, Father, all things are possible for You. Take this cup away from Me; nevertheless, not what I will, but what You will.”

Then He came and found them sleeping, and said to Peter, “Simon, are you sleeping? Could you not watch one hour? Watch and pray, lest you enter into temptation. The spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak.” Mark 14: 32-38.

Jesus found all three disciples sleeping. These three, who had so vehemently insisted previously that they were ready to share his sufferings and would never deny Him were so unconcerned by their Master’s sorrow and pain that they slept while He agonized and prayed. Luke’s account details that Jesus was so distressed that He sweat drops of blood—while His three key men took a nap!

Yet, when Jesus found his inner circle in slumber He did not address all three by name, only Peter. Why? Peter was the leader. Jesus expected more from him. After all, he boasted the loudest about his fidelity only a few moments prior in Mark 14:31 when he vehemently spoke the words, “If I have to die with You, I will not deny You!”

The lesson here is clear: when the leader sleeps, so does the team! If a leader catches cold, you can expect the followers to come down with pneumonia. This is precisely why leaders must be held to a higher standard than those they lead: in businesses, churches, governments and families.

Day 138-140: How to Lead by THE BOOK: The Key to Making the Right Decisions!

Friday, November 26th, 2010

Yesterday, Thanksgiving, was a great time to combine spending time with my family, and making progress on the final three chapters of How to Lead by THE BOOK. We smoked a turkey for ten hours–and it turned out great! I also prepared my somewhat famous eggs benedict, served exclusively to special family members on holiday occasions. Many readers don’t realize that I have a bit of a cooking and baking background that began long before I got into sales. I worked in several restaurants right out of school, and can still whip up a mean batch of from-scratch cinnamon rolls! However, nothing compares to the homemade yeast rolls Rhonda makes! She uses her grandma’s recipe, lets the dough rise three times by the fireplace, and cranks out mouthwatering dinner rolls the size of hamburger buns! Thus, it was a great challenge to write last night as my bloated belly made it difficult to focus on work.

The title of chapter 13, which I made some progress on yesterday despite the culinary distractions is: How do I know God’s will as I make decisions in my business and life?

Of all the chapters, I believe this one has the potential to add the most value to readers, as there is so much confusion on this important topic. While I touched on this topic here a couple of months ago, I want to include an exact excerpt from the beginning of chapter 13 here:

Man’s Wisdom and Way

“If your intentions are good and you don’t violate God’s principles, He will bless your decisions because He wants you to prosper. Besides, what sort of testimony does a “failure” of a Christian have in the business world? Use the gifts and talents that God gives you for moral purposes and God will stay on your side. Make a decision, and if you don’t feel any inner conflict, God is with you. That’s a sign to move forward in faith. At that point, ask God to bless your decision and then move in that direction.”

The BOOK’s Wisdom and Way

Christians commonly take missteps as they mistake faith for presumption. You cannot make godly decisions, and nor will you know God’s will for anything until you give up control of your life to God. Most Christians make decisions about what they want to do and then ask God to bless those decisions. Instead, you must commit to what God wants for you, and then ask Him to reveal it. The commitment comes before the understanding because God doesn’t share His will for contemplation but for participation.

You’ll have a far easier time making godly decisions if you know what’s in God’s word. This is because His will for you won’t contradict His word.  God’s word acts as a filter for decision-making. The more you understand it the easier it is for you to know what to do, and what not to do in a given situation.

It’s about relationship

While speaking at a conference, a businessman asked me, “How do I hear God’s voice in my daily business walk?” I answered as follows:

The key to hearing God’s voice in anything is your relationship with Him. The closer your relationship to God, the easier it is to know what He wants and expects. Frankly, you cannot develop an intimate relationship with anyone unless you send time with them. God is no different. Sending up a flare prayer every once in a while when you need something is not going to build a relationship with God. You’ll remain little more than a casual acquaintance.

Day 136-137: How to Lead by THE BOOK: When Drastic Action is Required!

Tuesday, November 23rd, 2010

As I completed my chapter on how culture changes behaviors within organizations for How to Lead by THE BOOK, I included examples of when drastic action is required to change a culture. I also outlined the importance of leaders becoming students of behaviors rather than students of “the numbers”. Here are the excerpts to explain:

Drastic action is sometimes required

Occasionally, a culture has devolved to the point where the organization cannot, or shouldn’t, be saved. In other words, it has reached the point of no return where no leader; set of values, mission, standards, competencies or group of people can turn things around. In these cases, it’s better to fold up the tents, clean house, and start over with a new leader. Or, if you’re God, you send a flood.

One of the saddest passages in THE BOOK is found in Genesis 6:5-7. No new vision here, a new culture was needed:

Then the Lord saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every intent of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually. And the Lord was sorry that He had made man on the earth, and He was grieved in His heart. So the Lord said, I will destroy man whom I have created from the face of the earth, both man, and beast, creeping thing, and birds of the air, for I am sorry that I have made them.”

Twelve chapters later, God decided that the grave sin of Sodom and Gomorrah warranted obliteration. As Jude described centuries later:

But I want to remind you, though you once knew this, that the Lord, having saved the people out of the land of Egypt, afterward destroyed those who did not believe. And the angels who did not keep their proper domain, but left their own abode. He has reserved in everlasting chains under darkness, for the judgment of the great day; as Sodom and Gomorrah, and the cities around them in a similar manner to these having given themselves over to sexual immorality and gone after strange flesh, are set forth as an example, suffering the vengeance of eternal fire. Jude 5-7.

Be a student of behaviors

You cannot change a culture by changing the “numbers.” Yet many leaders pride themselves as great students of the numbers. Instead, they should become a student of behaviors, because the behaviors portend where the numbers are headed.

The “numbers” in your organization are a result of the culture. This is because culture dictates behaviors and behaviors determine results. By carefully watching the daily behaviors of your people, you can intervene and strengthen the culture and subsequent behaviors before the numbers show up. On the other hand, if you’re watching only for the numbers, all you’re seeing are the lagging indicators. Numbers show up too late to change anything! It’s like confusing the scoreboard for the game. If all you’re doing is gazing at the scoreboard, you’re missing the game—and the opportunity to influence the behaviors within the game that determine what goes up on the scoreboard.

When you study behaviors within your organization, you can effectively predict the future. The daily behaviors of your people will tell you exactly where the numbers are headed. In fact, your organization’s past culture-induced behaviors have brought you to where you are today.

Day 132-135 How to Lead by THE BOOK: Avoid These Two Dangerous Leadership Mistakes!

Sunday, November 21st, 2010

I’ve now completed 35,000 of the 50,000 words needed to finish How to Lead by THE BOOK. I’ve covered eleven major business challenges thus far making for short, to-the-point chapters.

Last night I put the finishing touches on the chapter, “What are two of the most dangerous mistakes I must avoid to become a more effective leader?” Obviously, there were lots to choose from! However, I decided to include the following two major blunders in the book:

1. The tendency to prioritize “stuff” over people.

2. The tendency to become too dependent on yourself.

Here’s an excerpt of how I opened the chapter:

Man’s Wisdom and Way

“Leadership brings pressures that will cause you to make mistakes. No one expects you to be perfect. If you fall short, ask forgiveness. When you commit leadership errors, learn from them.  The bottom line is that, since everyone makes their own share of blunders, yours are none of their business.”

If you believe the veracity of Man’s Wisdom and Way, please re-read chapter two, and pay more attention this time! As a leader, your mistakes are everyone’s business because your actions have a greater impact on the culture, morale, momentum and organizational results than any one else’s. You also have the responsibility of setting a righteous example for followers. To appreciate your influence on their behavior, you must grasp that the positive actions you take in excess followers will emulate in moderation. However, the negative actions you initiate in moderation, your followers will imitate in excess. You also accrue a bad reputation and encourage further cultural corruption when your own words and deeds are inconsistent. Sir Francis Bacon explained it well: “He that gives good admonition and bad example builds with one hand and pulls down with the other.”

THE BOOK’s wisdom and way

You are not expected to become perfect. But you should strive towards imitating a perfect Lord and Savior as you are instructed in Ephesians 5:1: “Therefore be imitators of God.”  Many leaders use the fact that they cannot become perfect human beings as license to stop striving.

As a leader, you are expected to do more than grow old; you are presumed to grow up and minimize your errors, correct your mistakes, and respond to missteps backwards with a steady gait forward.

Leaders face many temptations and often fall into common traps that affect their character and performance. Loose morals, lousy judgment, outright ignorance, and blatant stupidity are the culprits beyond most failures. However, there is one primary perpetrator that underlines each of these causes: pride.  In How to Rum Your Business by THE BOOK (Wiley, 2009), I devoted an entire chapter explaining how pride is the number one cause of leadership failure. Suffice to say, that if you struggle with either of these common leadership mistakes I mention in this chapter, pride is at the root of your problem. And if you suddenly became defensive or defiant in the face of my accusation that you may have a problem with pride, it is certain evidence that you are guilty as charged!