Posts Tagged ‘Ephesians 4:26’

Day 37 How to Lead by THE BOOK: Get Mad or Even?

Friday, August 13th, 2010

There’s an old saying that goes, “Don’t get mad, get even.” Frankly, that’s lousy advice!

Unfortunately, business people waste a lot of energy plotting revenge on competitors, bosses, and co-workers for sleights and injuries, perceived or real. They rehearse offenses over again in their minds, zapping themselves of any power in the present, because they continue living in the past.

In, How to Lead by THE BOOK, I’ll address what the Bible has to say about a wide range of emotions that leaders may feel on a daily basis: anger, worry, lust, and the like. Interestingly, the Bible never declares these emotions themselves as sinful. Rather, it is what the emotions can cause you to do that makes them very dangerous. To lead effectively and with integrity, it’s essential to understand this difference.

Take anger for instance, In Matthew 5:22, Jesus says: “But I say to you that whoever is angry with his brother without a cause shall be in danger of judgment…” Notice, He didn’t say that if you’re angry you’ve already sinned and are judged. Instead, He used the words “in danger of judgment.” Why would feeling angry put you in danger of judgment? Because of the sin it may cause you to commit. Thus, anger in itself is not sin, but it is dangerous! In Ephesians 4:26 Paul wrote, “Be angry and do not sin: do not let the sun go down on your wrath¬† nor give place to the devil.” The fact that he said, “be angry and do not sin” shows us that anger and sin are not one in the same. However, the danger of remaining angry is made clear by his admonition to “not let the sun go down on your wrath, nor give place to the devil.” As most of us have learned from experience, when you stay angry, you are more likely to sin. As the offense builds up in you, you’re likely to strike back physically, to sin with your speech, and the like.

We all feel a wide range of emotions on the job and at home from day to day. Some are healthy and others are deadly. It’s what you do as a result of the emotions that determines a sinful act or lifestyle. While you cannot choose what happens to you, you are responsible for your response to it. And the quality of your response will go a long way in determining the quality of your emotional well being, your leadership, and your life.