Posts Tagged ‘David and Eliab’

Day 25 How to Lead by THE BOOK: Hire with Your Head, not Your Heart!

Sunday, August 1st, 2010

Experts say that the number one cause of hiring errors comes from making emotional hiring decisions that are triggered by an applicant’s personality and appearance. In other words we tend to focus more on the external; the “sizzle”, than we focus on the internal; the character. Perhaps this is because the outward is easier to determine than the internal qualities. Thus, you need a strategy for uncovering character issues during an interview. You must hire with your head, not with your heart!

Even biblical leaders made the mistake of focusing too much on the external. Look at what happened when Samuel was sent to the house of Jesse in Bethlehem to anoint the future king of Israel from among Jesse’s eight sons:

So it was, when they came, that he looked at Eliab and said, “Surely the Lord’s anointed is before Him!”

But the Lord said to Samuel, “Do not look at his appearance or at his physical stature, because I have refused him. For the Lord does not see as man sees; for man looks at the outward appearance, but the Lord looks at the heart.” 1 Samuel 16:6-7.

To make a long story short, Samuel anointed the youngest son, David, and biblical history demonstrated that a spiteful and bitter Eliab would have made a terrible king. Incidentally, the right candidate doesn’t necessarily have to be the ugly one either! Scripture describes David as, “ruddy, with bright eyes, and good looking.”

One of Jesus’ greatest frustrations with the religious experts of His day, the Pharisees, was their obsession with outward appearances and traditions, while their inner character was selfish, greedy, hypocritical, and covetous.

In, How to Lead by THE BOOK, I will present a biblically-based hiring strategy that helps you to determine the character traits of a candidate as a priority. In fact, character should trump competence, because you can teach skills and knowledge, but you cannot teach character. I will provide specific, character-determining questions to ask during an interview that will help flush out the existence, or lack of, the nonnegotiable qualities of integrity essential to have in all of your employees. I believe this will be one of the most widely applicable and practical of the 70 strategies I provide in the book.